Promotion in Doubt Meeting for Students with Disabilities and ENL Students
Mar
21
9:00 AM09:00

Promotion in Doubt Meeting for Students with Disabilities and ENL Students

How do schools make promotion decisions?

  • Promotion decisions are made by each school principal based on multiple measures of student readiness for the next grade level in English and math.

  • Teachers review student work from the school year to identify students who may not be ready for the work of the next grade in English language arts and/or math, even with support. Students whose work shows they are ready for the next grade are promoted by the principal in June.

  • If a student's work shows they may not be ready for the next grade level, the teacher completes and scores the portfolio. The principal makes the promotion decision based on the portfolio results.

If your child is not promoted in June based on their portfolio results, your child is mandated for summer school. At the end of summer school, the school reviews the progress of the student, and the principal makes the final promotion decision.

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PK Application Deadline is Friday, March 15th
Mar
15
12:00 AM00:00

PK Application Deadline is Friday, March 15th

Who Can Apply?

Every family of a four-year-old in New York City can apply to pre-K. Children born in 2015 will begin pre-K in September 2019. All children of this age who are also current New York City residents are welcome to apply, including:

  • current 3-K students at public district schools, Pre-K Centers, and NYC Early Education Centers (NYCEECs);

  • current students in three-year-old programs at charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, or other preschools;

  • children with disabilities;

  • children with accessibility needs;

  • children learning English;

  • children in temporary housing;

  • LGBTQ and gender nonconforming children; and

  • children who are new to NYC public schools.

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Open School Night/Parent-Caregiver and Teacher Conferences
Mar
14
11:30 AM11:30

Open School Night/Parent-Caregiver and Teacher Conferences

Day conferences run from 12:35pm – 2:35pm and evening conferences run from 5pm – 8pm. All students are dismissed at 11:30am. There is NO Boys and Girls Club After-School on Thursday, March 14th.

Questions Parents/Caregivers May Ask During Open School Night Conferences

  • What academic standards do you use, and what do I need to know about them?

  • How is my child doing socially?

  • What are my child’s strengths… challenges?

  • What can I do at home to support what you’re doing in the class?

  • How will you respond if or when my child struggles in class?

  • What are the most important and complex (content-related) ideas my child needs to understand by the end of the year?

  • Do you focus on strengths or weaknesses?

  • How are creativity and innovative thinking used on a daily basis in your classroom?

  • How is critical thinking used on a daily basis in your classroom?

  • How are assessments designed to promote learning rather than simple measurement?

  • What can I do to support literacy in my home?

  • What kinds of questions do you suggest that I ask my children on a daily basis about your class?

  • How exactly is learning personalized in your classroom? In the school?

  • How do you measure academic progress?

  • What are the most common instructional or literacy strategies you will use this year?

  • What learning models do you use (e.g., project-based learning, mobile learning, game-based learning, etc.), and what do you see as the primary benefits of that approach?

  • What are the best school or district resources that we should consider using as a family to support our child in the classroom?

  • Is there technology you'd recommend that can help support my child in self-directed learning?

  • What are the most common barriers you see to academic progress in your classroom?

  • How is education changing?

  • How do you see the role of the teacher in the learning process?

  • What am I not asking but should be?

 

 

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Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families
Mar
8
9:00 AM09:00

Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families

Apply to Pre-K in Early February!

The pre-K application for children born in 2015 opens next month, and the deadline to apply is March 15, 2019. 

Who Can Apply to Pre-K?

Every family of a four-year-old in New York City can apply to pre-K. Children born in 2015 will begin pre-K in September 2019. Your child must be a current New York City resident to apply.

All of the following students are welcome to apply to pre-K:

  • Current 3-K students at public district schools, Pre-K Centers, and NYC Early Education Centers (NYCEECs)

  • Current students in three-year-old programs at charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, or other preschools

  • Students with disabilities

  • Students with accessibility needs

  • Students learning English

  • Students in temporary housing

  • LGBTQ and gender nonconforming students

  • Students who are new to NYC public schools—if you move to NYC during the school year, visit the New Students page to learn how to enroll

  • Contact Griselda Hernandez, Parent Coordinator at (212) 666-6400 ext. 2004 or GHernandez4@schools.nyc.gov.

  • Please sign in the MAIN OFFICE.

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Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families
Mar
1
9:00 AM09:00

Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families

Apply to Pre-K in Early February!

The pre-K application for children born in 2015 opens next month, and the deadline to apply is March 15, 2019. 

Who Can Apply to Pre-K?

Every family of a four-year-old in New York City can apply to pre-K. Children born in 2015 will begin pre-K in September 2019. Your child must be a current New York City resident to apply.

All of the following students are welcome to apply to pre-K:

  • Current 3-K students at public district schools, Pre-K Centers, and NYC Early Education Centers (NYCEECs)

  • Current students in three-year-old programs at charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, or other preschools

  • Students with disabilities

  • Students with accessibility needs

  • Students learning English

  • Students in temporary housing

  • LGBTQ and gender nonconforming students

  • Students who are new to NYC public schools—if you move to NYC during the school year, visit the New Students page to learn how to enroll

  • Contact Griselda Hernandez, Parent Coordinator at (212) 666-6400 ext. 2004 or GHernandez4@schools.nyc.gov.

  • Please sign in the MAIN OFFICE.

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Black Migrations
Feb
28
8:30 AM08:30

Black Migrations

African-American History (Theme: Black Migrations)

Black Migrations emphasizes the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities. While inclusive of earlier centuries, this theme focuses especially on the twentieth century through today. Such migrations resulted in a more diverse America.  The impact was experienced with the emergence of black entrepeneurs; new music forms like ragtime, blues and jazz; the blossoming of visual and literay arts; civil rights and protest activism; and the movement of African and Caribbean populations in the United States.

On Thursday, February 28th we will celebrate”Black Migrations” at the RBS.  Each class will select an element that can be shared with families and will sponsor a classroom “Soulful Brunch” to be enjoyed by the kids, families and staff. We are hosting the events inside of classrooms to create a more intimate environment for the families.

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Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families
Feb
15
9:00 AM09:00

Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families

Apply to Pre-K in Early February!

The pre-K application for children born in 2015 opens next month, and the deadline to apply is March 15, 2019. 

Who Can Apply to Pre-K?

Every family of a four-year-old in New York City can apply to pre-K. Children born in 2015 will begin pre-K in September 2019. Your child must be a current New York City resident to apply.

All of the following students are welcome to apply to pre-K:

  • Current 3-K students at public district schools, Pre-K Centers, and NYC Early Education Centers (NYCEECs)

  • Current students in three-year-old programs at charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, or other preschools

  • Students with disabilities

  • Students with accessibility needs

  • Students learning English

  • Students in temporary housing

  • LGBTQ and gender nonconforming students

  • Students who are new to NYC public schools—if you move to NYC during the school year, visit the New Students page to learn how to enroll

  • Contact Griselda Hernandez, Parent Coordinator at (212) 666-6400 ext. 2004 or GHernandez4@schools.nyc.gov.

  • Please sign in the MAIN OFFICE.

View Event →
Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families
Feb
1
9:00 AM09:00

Pre-Kindergarten Tour for Prospective Families

Apply to Pre-K in Early February!

The pre-K application for children born in 2015 opens next month, and the deadline to apply is March 15, 2019. 

Who Can Apply to Pre-K?

Every family of a four-year-old in New York City can apply to pre-K. Children born in 2015 will begin pre-K in September 2019. Your child must be a current New York City resident to apply.

All of the following students are welcome to apply to pre-K:

  • Current 3-K students at public district schools, Pre-K Centers, and NYC Early Education Centers (NYCEECs)

  • Current students in three-year-old programs at charter schools, private schools, parochial schools, or other preschools

  • Students with disabilities

  • Students with accessibility needs

  • Students learning English

  • Students in temporary housing

  • LGBTQ and gender nonconforming students

  • Students who are new to NYC public schools—if you move to NYC during the school year, visit the New Students page to learn how to enroll

  • Contact Griselda Hernandez, Parent Coordinator at (212) 666-6400 ext. 2004 or GHernandez4@schools.nyc.gov.

  • Please sign in the MAIN OFFICE.

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Parent/Caregiver Session:  Promotion In Doubt Meeting
Jan
30
5:00 PM17:00

Parent/Caregiver Session: Promotion In Doubt Meeting

Grading Policy

The purpose of any system of reporting to parents/caregivers is to strengthen the home-school partnership and to inform parents/caregivers concerning student progress. The degree to which parents/caregivers are informed of the philosophy of the New York City Department of Education, its programs, and the assessment of students’ strengths and weaknesses is important in establishing a positive attitude toward school and a cooperative relationship between school and home. Assessments should be straightforward with teacher judgments based on objective data. The K-5 reports cards reflect the instructional level of students. Report cards should be communicated in terms understood by those involved. The main objective of an elementary report card is to communicate to parents/caregivers what students know and are able to do. The Ralph Bunche School—P.S., 125 takes this mission very seriously, and is committed to providing the best possible information to parents/caregivers. Research shows that student success is highly correlated with family involvement in school progress. Standards-based grading is a way to communicate what students know at a point in time rather than an average of performance over an entire period. It measures a student’s performance according to the standards taught rather than comparing student progress to other students.

Instruction is planned, implemented, and assessed using state and city guidelines. Student progress is evaluated every quarter based on skills within each standard for the specific grade level based on expectations for the curriculum taught during that period of time. Effort and academics are reported separately so the parents/caregivers know the effort of the student as well as understanding of specific skills. Individualized comments will continue to be an important part of parent/caregiver communication on the standards-based report card. Grades on the elementary report card can assist parents/caregivers in making informed decisions regarding course selection at the middle school level.

 Academic achievement may be measured in a variety of ways, including compositions, presentations, oral discussion, student work samples, observations, tests, and the products of project-based learning activities. Teachers should use the most current summative assessment data when determining achievement marks for the report card. When determining what marks to use on daily and weekly assignments, remember that these marks should not conflict with the grades on the report card. Teachers should not use subjective statements like good, excellent or poor when marking papers. One option might include: Written feedback Rubric scores (if using 4, 3, 2, or 1 on papers, there should be guidance as to what these marks mean) Keep in mind that work that is sent home provides parents/caregivers with a general impression of how students are achieving in school but does not provide a complete picture. Other assessment data are collected that encompasses the report card grade and some of these assessments are not sent home.  Communication regarding progress should be ongoing via Bloomz. Homework can be considered as part of the Academic and Personal Behaviors grade, but would not be used to grade academic achievement in elementary school since the function of homework is to provide practice in skill areas.

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Parent/Caregiver Session:  Promotion in Doubt Meeting
Jan
30
8:30 AM08:30

Parent/Caregiver Session: Promotion in Doubt Meeting

Grading Policy

The purpose of any system of reporting to parents/caregivers is to strengthen the home-school partnership and to inform parents/caregivers concerning student progress. The degree to which parents/caregivers are informed of the philosophy of the New York City Department of Education, its programs, and the assessment of students’ strengths and weaknesses is important in establishing a positive attitude toward school and a cooperative relationship between school and home. Assessments should be straightforward with teacher judgments based on objective data. The K-5 reports cards reflect the instructional level of students. Report cards should be communicated in terms understood by those involved. The main objective of an elementary report card is to communicate to parents/caregivers what students know and are able to do. The Ralph Bunche School—P.S., 125 takes this mission very seriously, and is committed to providing the best possible information to parents/caregivers. Research shows that student success is highly correlated with family involvement in school progress. Standards-based grading is a way to communicate what students know at a point in time rather than an average of performance over an entire period. It measures a student’s performance according to the standards taught rather than comparing student progress to other students.

Instruction is planned, implemented, and assessed using state and city guidelines. Student progress is evaluated every quarter based on skills within each standard for the specific grade level based on expectations for the curriculum taught during that period of time. Effort and academics are reported separately so the parents/caregivers know the effort of the student as well as understanding of specific skills. Individualized comments will continue to be an important part of parent/caregiver communication on the standards-based report card. Grades on the elementary report card can assist parents/caregivers in making informed decisions regarding course selection at the middle school level.

 Academic achievement may be measured in a variety of ways, including compositions, presentations, oral discussion, student work samples, observations, tests, and the products of project-based learning activities. Teachers should use the most current summative assessment data when determining achievement marks for the report card. When determining what marks to use on daily and weekly assignments, remember that these marks should not conflict with the grades on the report card. Teachers should not use subjective statements like good, excellent or poor when marking papers. One option might include: Written feedback Rubric scores (if using 4, 3, 2, or 1 on papers, there should be guidance as to what these marks mean) Keep in mind that work that is sent home provides parents/caregivers with a general impression of how students are achieving in school but does not provide a complete picture. Other assessment data are collected that encompasses the report card grade and some of these assessments are not sent home.  Communication regarding progress should be ongoing via Bloomz. Homework can be considered as part of the Academic and Personal Behaviors grade, but would not be used to grade academic achievement in elementary school since the function of homework is to provide practice in skill areas.

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Kindergarten Tour
Dec
14
8:45 AM08:45

Kindergarten Tour

Kindergarten application will open for families on Wednesday, December 5th. The deadline for families to submit an application is January 14th. Families can apply online, over the phone at 718-935-2009, and in person at a [schools.nyc.gov/WelcomeCenters]Family Welcome Center.

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Kindergarten Tour
Dec
7
8:45 AM08:45

Kindergarten Tour

Kindergarten application will open for families on Wednesday, December 5th. The deadline for families to submit an application is January 14th. Families can apply online, over the phone at 718-935-2009, and in person at a [schools.nyc.gov/WelcomeCenters]Family Welcome Center.

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